RockTape FMT Course

We are excited to announce that on November 9th and 10th

Adams Sports Medicine & Physical Therapy will be the host for the upcoming RockTape Fascial Movement Taping (FMT)

Level 1 and Level 2 courses

Located in Novi, Michigan, our clinic is easily accessible by the surrounding major cities of Michigan, Northern Ohio, Illinois and Indiana. We would love to have you here to share in the knowledge. (The upcoming Chicago FMT course is already sold out!).

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Dr. Ed Le Cara

Ed Le Cara DC, PhD, ATC, CSCS

Leading the course will be Dr. Ed Le Cara. Ed is an expert in manual and exercise therapy for athletes and clients and Board Certified in both Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine. He is the President and founder of SportsPlus: Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation in Pleasanton, CA that has provided rehabilitation and athletic training coverage at all levels since the year 2000. He combines his backgrounds to be a sought after speaker, researcher, consultant, and clinician. Ed holds a PhD in Athletic Training. His dissertation research was focused on the lumbar multifidus morphology and function. Ed holds a clinical appointment at the Veteran’s Administration in Martinez, CA where he conducts research and treats patients in the Center for Integrated Brain Health and Wellness and oversees student interns from Palmer College of Chiropractic. He is the Sports Science and Human Performance consultant for 24 Hour Fitness Corporate and is a Master Instructor for TRX Sports Medicine Suspension Training.

More info about the FMT course:

WHAT TO EXPECT?

Not your average taping course. Fascial Movement Taping Certification is a 2-part certification process led by industry leading experts in functional movement assessment and treatment. Fascial Movement Taping (FMT) is based on the obvious yet largely overlooked concept of muscles acting as a chain. Say good-bye to thinking about origins and insertions and memorizing directions of tape. Say hello to a framework of ‘taping movement, not muscles’.

FMT LEVEL 1 CERTIFICATION

This course introduces the concept of movement therapy and enhancement via functional taping methods. It includes a review of the current literature supporting the theory of kinesiology taping for the purposes of rehabilitation, edema/swelling management, neuropathic pain, scar mobility and postural management. The course is intended for therapists and practitioners with all levels of experience with taping. All supplies needed for the course are provided.

EDUCATION OBJECTIVES LEVEL 1:

  1. Introduce the concept of a longitudinal muscle chain approach to the elastic therapeutic taping (Fascial Movement Taping)
  2. Understand the physiological effects of kinesiology taping
  3. Master functional taping and understand its role and use for the applications of rehabilitation, edema management, neuropathic pain, scar mobility and posture improvement . Corrective exercise strategies for movement mobility and stability dysfunctions will be integrated with taping protocols.
  4. Introduce a myofascial sequencing model of “taping movements, not muscles.”

FMT LEVEL 2 CERTIFICATION

This course introduces the concept of movement therapy and performance enhancement via functional taping methods. The anatomy and physiology of myofascial slings is covered. Movement assessment to determine dysfunction in specific slings and how to apply tape in a manner that improves movement and function is done in a workshop, hands-on environment. Corrective exercise techniques to address joint mobility and stability dysfunctions along these myofascial pathways are presented. This course is intended for therapists and practitioners who have taken FMT1. All supplies needed for the course are provided.

EDUCATION OBJECTIVES LEVEL 2:

  1. Introduce the myofascial sequencing model
  2. Learn movement assessment techniques to identify faulty motor patterns
  3. Master functional taping applications for Performance Chains (including applications for special populations)
  4. Integrate assessment of sport-specific movement patterns and the use of taping to improve sports performance (Power Taping)

FMT FAQ

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF CERTIFICATION?

Join a growing number of providers listed on our website as FMT Certified Providers.

Rocktape will call on FMT Certified Providers (Level 1 and 2) to assist with major sporting events around the country,

to include Crossfit Regional Competitions, marathons etc. A great way for you to meet your community under one of the most popular tents at events.

Join our FMT Community with access to the latest research and treatment strategies as they become available.


WHO CAN ATTEND AN FMT LEVEL 1 CLINIC?

The class is intended for therapists and healthcare practitioners with all levels of exposure to kinesiology taping.

HOW CAN I OBTAIN MY FMT LEVEL 1 CERTIFICATION?

Attend a live course – click here
Take an online course – coming soon
Host a clinic in your area – contact us

WHO CAN ATTEND AN FMT LEVEL 2 CLINIC?

Therapists and healthcare providers who have their FMT Level 1 Certification

WHERE CAN I ATTEND AN FMT LEVEL 2 CERTIFICATION CLINIC?

You must attend a live course to obtain your Level 2 FMT Certification. View FMT Training Classes

I HAVE TAKEN OTHER KINESIOLOGY TAPING COURSES, CAN I SKIP YOUR LEVEL 1 COURSE AND REGISTER FOR LEVEL 2?

No. Our FMT Level 1 course lays the foundation for understanding FMT’s approach to kinesiology taping and outlines many of the differences in taping applications vs other courses. There will be new things to learn and other taping applications to ‘unlearn’ before moving onto Level 2. For this reason, we require you to take the Level 1 course before moving onto the Level 2.

HOW MANY CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS ARE AVAILABLE FOR EACH COURSE?

Depending on class size, state regulations and focus, CEUs may be offered at a FMT clinic. Please see the details for specific classes which can be found in the RockTape store.

HOW DO I GET LISTED AS AN ONLINE PROVIDER?
Once you attend an FMT Certification you will receive an email with a link to the form you need to complete to be listed on our site. Please remember that you must have made a purchase of tape before being listed.  Your name will then appear in our ‘Find a FMT Certified Provider” search.

CAN I USE THE TERM “FMT” OR LOGO, OR TERMS FASCIAL MOVEMENT TAPING CERTIFIED?

Yes, you can and you should.

WHAT IF I CAN’T ATTEND A COURSE I SIGNED UP FOR? CAN I TRANSFER TO ANOTHER COURSE?

Sure.

WHAT IS THE CANCELLATION POLICY?

Full refund for valid excuses.

I WANT TO HOST AN FMT CERTIFICATION AT MY CLINIC?

Email us for more information. contact us

DO YOU GIVE GROUP DISCOUNTS FOR YOUR SEMINARS?

We sure do, for greater than 5 people – email us your group size. contact us

WHAT DO I NEED TO BRING TO A FMT COURSE?

All class supplies are provided, wear loose clothing. Shorts preferable.

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Barefoot Running

 

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Photo Credit: Paul Glamou/Getty Images

 

Do you run? Do you run barefoot? Do you coach/train athletes that run barefoot? Then take a look at this timely summary article from the British Journal of Sports Medicine (Oct 2013). (institutional access required). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24108403

It’s seems obvious to say that people have been running barefoot for centuries…to spare their lives from a saber-tooth tiger, or to deliver the word of Persian defeat ( Pheidippides, a Greek messenger)…but in modern times, barefoot running has become a new passion for many, a fad for some, and a hot topic in the world of running, coaching and rehabilitation.

There exists multiple camps, separated by research and results. Some say it exposes athletes to unnecessary trauma while inducing soft tissue and structural damage to the runner. Others feel that it actually helps prevent injuries by changing the stride length of the runner, while swapping out a heavy heel-strike to a softer, modulated fore-foot strike.

Barefoot-Running-Cadence

The research…the evidence…is still mounting. But the jury is still out. At least there are some very smart clinicians, researchers and coaches out there to sift through the details and help get us timely information to make healthy decisions.

Take a look at the above-mentioned article, and help yourself in making the right choice for your running style, goals and physical needs!

And keep on running!

 

How safe is cycling?

IN a recent blog/post by New York Times writer Gian Kolata, the concept of safety in cycling is discussed. And with good merit. It is a good read, complete with statistics and insight from well-respected medical professionals.

One consideration I would like to add is that the mechanism of injury (MOI) for many cycling injuries is overlooked. In the article, it is assumed that the MOI for cycling is traumatic in nature, as in a collision or fall. Yet they compare this to running (stress fractures) and swimming (rotator cuff tendinitis), which are typically non-traumatic.

Unlike injuries in other sports — a stress fracture from running or a rotator cuff tear from swimming — cycling injuries do not come on gradually.

Many cycling MOIs are repetitive-use, over-use or cumulative load injuries resulting in inflamed tissues, soft tissue compression, tendinitis and often times tendinosis. A significant amount of these are preventable with a well structured training plan (with focus on hydration/nutrition and recovery), proper bike fit and special attention to the any of the cyclist’s biomechanical faults.

Read her article HERE

And enjoy the ride….

Forefoot Wedges in Cycling

 

Adams Sports Medicine & Physical Therapy – Novi, MI
Wednesday Warrant: why we do what we do…
In sports medicine, when we analyze gait, one thing we pay particular attention to is the mechanics of the foot. Especially when the foot hits the ground, which typically is at the heel, and how this affects the foot/leg movements (biomechanics).In cycling, the contact/load point is at the ball of the foot. So the clinician needs to approach the foot mechanics from a different perspective. In a word: forefoot.Here is a nicely written article/summary from across the pond. Let me know if you have any questions or thoughts!

http://www.sportspa.com.ba/images/dec2010/full/rad1.pdf

Wednesday Warrant: why we do what we do...</p><br />
<p>In sports medicine, when we analyze gait, one thing we pay particular attention to is the mechanics of the foot. Especially when the foot hits the ground, which typically is at the heel, and how this affects the foot/leg movements (biomechanics). </p><br />
<p>In cycling, the contact/load point is at the ball of the foot. So the clinician needs to approach the foot mechanics from a different perspective. In a word: forefoot. </p><br />
<p>Here is a nicely written article/summary from across the pond. Let me know if you have any questions or thoughts!</p><br />
<p>http://www.sportspa.com.ba/images/dec2010/full/rad1.pdf

Bike Fit from Medicine of Cycling

 

Another great publication from the Medicine of Cycling group. Curtis gives a great bike fit overview. Not all cyclists come with the same goals, the same experience nor the same equipment. Moreover, their strength, flexibility and riding technique all play a part in the bike fit process. Each should be addressed on an individual basis!

The next MoC conference will be held again next fall!

 

 

 or click on this link: Bike Fit: It’s All About the Bike – UCTV – University of California Television.